Happy Birthday, Patrick Henry: “This Constitution is said to have beautiful features; but when I come to examine these features, sir, they appear to me horribly frightful.”

quote-the-liberties-of-a-people-never-were-nor-ever-will-be-secure-when-the-transactions-of-their-patrick-henry-83407

GVDL gives aid and comfort to another damned anarchist.

Dissolve the bankrupt-in-every-sense FedGov.

Before their madness get worse.

24 responses to “Happy Birthday, Patrick Henry: “This Constitution is said to have beautiful features; but when I come to examine these features, sir, they appear to me horribly frightful.”

  1. I’m past caring what the Wall St./Hollywood Judeo-klepto globalists and their puppet CEO’s/politicians do. If anything, TPP will add tension to the ratchet gear of History, and that’s good. The so-called “madness” needs to get worse. Much, much worse

  2. Jim Klein

    Patrick Henry, wasn’t he a Patriot? A Founder, yes?

    So in light of this cite, how rational does “The Constitution, AS INTENDED,” sound? Here’s how rational…not very.

  3. I contend that the fastest way to dissolution of the state is to stop funding it. The nexus between the Federal Reserve, U.S. tax code, SS system and the debt, is the funny money they are using to prop up the sandcastle.

    Everyone complains about all of the above but most continue to fund it through their sheep-like compliance with the “system of voluntary self assessment” – federal income tax.

    • Jimmy the Saint

      So then you’re not paying any of your taxes, right?

      And it isn’t “sheep-like” when the penalty for going against the system is the guaranteed loss of everything: property, liberty, and possibly even life.

      Unless and until there’s a definite group that publicly leads by example, despite the consequences, everyone else will opt for the better part of valor.

  4. The US Constitution is probably as good as it gets. It was written and adopted by hard men. Most had fought in a war and got their hands dirty working their farms. Some of them resolved disputes with a duel. Even the ones who spent their entire lives in the city still had to shit in an outhouse and watch half their children die before age one. They were educated men. They knew first hand the horrors of life under tyranny.

    Today, we have career politicians, some “intellectuals” if you will, that have never broken a sweat with a shovel in their hand. They write laws that put pre-teen boys in jail for being boys and handling disputes with a fist fight, but if he sucks cock he gets hailed as a hero.

    Even the hardest of men in this country don’t have the qualifications of our Founding Fathers. Our hard men are not educated and our educated men are not hard. And none know anything of life under tyranny.

    Men like Robert Gates may be the closest we can produce today and he wants to put the Boy Scouts under the watch of cock sucking queers. Today, we could not put together a group of men to match the qualifications of the Founding Fathers who are worthy to even amend the US Constitution.

    The US Constitution we have is as good as it can get.

    • The Constitution was written by lawyers. Been good business for them ever since.

      It can get better: institute rules which place the initiative in the hands of the people, like independent grand juries and “New Texas” rules.
      http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Planet_for_Texans

      • I didn’t say it couldn’t be improved. I’m saying we got the best we could get with the only men capable of writing and adopting it. We will never see the same caliber of men joined together for a common cause.

        It could be improved, but if that’s the best they could do, it will never be improved. Not for the USA. It might be possible for a country separated from the USA.

  5. Comrade X

    Thank God that those like Patrick Henry’s, George Mason “(heโ€™d rather cut off his hand” than sign the Constitution), and Samuel Adams (“And that the said Constitution be never construed to authorize Congress to infringe the just liberty of the press, or the rights of conscience; or to prevent the people of the United States, who are peaceable citizens, from keeping their own arms….”) opposed the constitution in it’s original form. Otherwise there would not have been a Bill of Rights added later; IMHO.

    Death before slavery!

  6. The cabal that saw to the implementation of the Constitution to replace the “perpetual” Articles of Confederation, constituted a bloodless coup. Well, bloodless at the time, that is.

    When the southern states lawfully seceded, Lincoln rebelled against the Constitution, violating Article III, Section III, which made him, his cabinet, and every general officer of the United States military traitors who should have been hung. Their treason saw the murders of over 500,000 of my people by the United States.

    The upshot of this is the United States Constitution is, in fact, functioning as intended by the cabal that created it.

    Here’s the response to the invasion of Arkansas, ordered by another treasonous president, Eisenhower.
    http://rcarterpittman.org/essays/misc/Federal_Invasion_of_Arkansas.html

  7. Alfred E. Neuman

    Reblogged this on The Lynler Report.

  8. outlawpatriot

    Heh. Yep, Patrick Henry. The man the anarchists always trot out when they want to advance just about any of the ills with regard to the Constitution, real or imagined.

    He was an interesting figure though. Certainly one of the prime movers of history in his day. At over six feet tall he possessed a commanding presence. His speeches were eloquent, powerful and highly emotional. He got his ass handed to him though at Virginia’s ratification convention by a rather quiet and demure man plagued with gastro-intestinal problems and piles by the name of Madison. One could conclude that some of Henry’s angst was due to that contest. Regardless, he was probably the only one that never really got on board with the new form of government.

    Interestingly, Henry branded anyone who agreed with Parliaments ability to tax the colonies as an enemy yet as governor of Virginia he not only raised taxes but did so without consent of the citizens. At least Hancock as governor of Massachusetts feigned exhaustion and resigned as governor in order not to raise taxes. He put that off on Boudowin rather than go against his principles. What might that say of Henry?

    We have a rich and very well chronicled history. While it’s not always pretty and there are at times some things that are contrary to our founding principles, we really are an exceptional nation. And blessed that we are Americans. Individual quotations while very nice should not be substituted for understanding the whole story. Especially if ya gotta fix it. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • How did that USC/BoR dealio work out, amigo?

      Phrased alternatively, who was a better prophet – Henry or Madison?

      • outlawpatriot

        Excellent question counselor. I would have to say it depends on where you’re coming from. ๐Ÿ˜‰

        As long as I’m limited to choosing between these two only I’m gonna have to go with Madison. As I stated above, Henry was rather emotional and not as deep a thinker as was Madison in my opinion. But you’re looking for which one was the better seer. So here are some pertinent Madison quotes:

        “The advancement and diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.”

        “Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.”

        “No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.”

        “I believe there are more instances of the abridgment of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations.”

        “The truth is that all men having power ought to be mistrusted.”

        “Charity is no part of the legislative duty of the government.”

        “Equal laws protecting equal rights… the best guarantee of loyalty and love of country.”

        “History records that the money changers have used every form of abuse, intrigue, deceit and violent means possible to maintain their control over governments by controlling money and it’s issuance.”

        I could go on but I hope you see my point. Madison essentially left an instruction manual for the Constitution. Henry really just bitched. ๐Ÿ™‚

        • Well played. ๐Ÿ™‚

          One of the many things I respect about Big Panda is his willingness to engage on the substance, rather than pooh-flinging (even if the initial sally is a flung turd :-)).

          But we come back to the point we have discussed FTF in the past:

          I get that folks have an attachment to the history (note that I did not say “mythology”?), the players, and the document(s). Enough folks do such that ignoring same is political poison.

          You get that “as written” and “as implemented” are worlds apart, as well as the fact that other than de-election (see Repub victory 2012) and impeachment, there is very little to restrain those who distort and pervert the original text and have armed force to back them.

          We both understand that any restoration of individual freedom in FUSA is not going to occur via the ballot box.

          And yet…

          Even the Red States are filled with folks who don’t get what Ghostsniper meant when he uttered the following:

          The issue is that nobody has any right to chain me to their fears or satisfy their greed at my involuntary expense and anyone who thinks otherwise, even just a little tiny bit can just go fuck right off and there’s simply no kind way to put that.

          Big, ugly road ahead, bro…

          • outlawpatriot

            Thank you sir. Understand that I wrote specifically for you. I knew before I punched the post button that you would acknowledge my retort in a positive vein. Your respect gives support to my position despite the fact that we are probably not playing the pipes in harmony. No matter. Nobody was in complete harmony in the 18th century either.

            Please allow me to take exception to your use of the word, “attachment”. I’m not attached. I am an American. This is my country. By any measurement the best this world has ever produced. Not perfect by any stretch of the imagination, but still a magnanimous nation unlike any before. I breath the same air, bleed the same blood, shoulder every burden the same as every other American. It’s what we do and have always done.

            Now, I could choose to believe that my country has been a sham from the get go. My study and belief tells me that is not the case. I equate the present to a body infected by a virus. We just need to find to find the cure. That cure resides in the writings of the men who designed the system. I may be naive but there’s not a single problem today that was not been addressed by those guys a quarter century ago. It does take intestinal fortitude and a willingness to suffer slings and arrows to maintain this nation. To allow it to be torn apart would be the way of a coward and a danger to us all.

            Your selection of a ghostsniper quote to bolster your response is unfortunate. He’s an anarchist. Not American. He’s probably not a bad guy, but certainly not a go to guy when solving the problem. It’s really, really important to understand that.

            Yeah, the road ahead may be ugly. But I have faith in my God and the exceptionalism of my country. I’m gonna be alright. Count on it. ๐Ÿ˜‰

            • From your lips to God’s ears, amigo.

            • Jim Klein

              “Your selection of a ghostsniper quote to bolster your response is unfortunate. Heโ€™s…”

              Golly, there it is again. Not the message, but the messenger. No wonder you seem so polished at it.

              And in the first case, attack a dead guy! It’s a little overzealous, don’t you think? Maybe try figuring out what the words mean.

    • Jim Klein

      Oh, character assassination. That new to you? You seem quite polished at it. It’s not about the message, but the messenger. Check.

      George Mason…lemme guess, was he queer or something?

      How ’bout the guy who wrote this; how’s he stand with you—“Rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others. I do not add ‘within the limits of the law’ because law is often but the tyrant’s will, and always so when it violates the rights of the individual.”

      Does he make it in the Club? “Four bam, three crack…”

      • outlawpatriot

        Ok dip shit. What are you responding to? Dumb anarchist fuck.

        • Jim Klein

          Is that me? Either way, I’m pleased to help. If you look at the line directly to the left of a comment and follow it up, it’ll dead-end into the comment to which it’s in response. I guess US history isn’t the only thing you don’t know shit about; no shocker there.

          Damn, I hope I’m not the “dumb fuck” there, cuz think what that would make you. Dumber fuck? Dumb fucker? Dumber fucker? Alright, you win…take ’em all!

          Reminds me of those Buddhist monks—self-immolation I think they called it; here I guess it would be self-degradation. Whatever it’s called, it was very bad for their health, and no doubt yours too.

          You keep ignoring me. Seems to keep you busy, and busy is good.