Montani Semper Liberi: The Art of Being Free in the Back of Beyond

apprifleman

Buppert sends; read it all.

Enjoy.

13 responses to “Montani Semper Liberi: The Art of Being Free in the Back of Beyond

  1. outlawpatriot

    The only Indian tribe to never sign a peace treaty?

    The Seminoles.

    And not a mountain in sight. 🙂

  2. Nice read. I’m Scots Irish with relations to NC. I agree with this to some extent:

    “a people who live in a rifle culture in mountainous terrain, are rarely if ever, militarily defeated”

    We’re not a “rifle culture” anymore. Even gun guys are focused on handguns now more than ever before. Very hard to get people to train at longer than 100 yds or even to leave the damn bench.

  3. Great point. Swamp peoples historically have had similar success to hill peoples.

    • outlawpatriot

      Well, of course. As have desert people.

      While I don’t necessarily disagree with the writer’s premise, I suspect that what’s really being floated is the idea of Appalachia becoming the Anarchist wet dream come to life.

      Dunno. We’ll see I suppose. 🙂

  4. I don’t think the treaties were worth spit but there are people here who are enchanted by the secret powers in signed government parchments; so here we go.

    The Seminoles signed treaties but refused to let them be carried out.

    http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/active_learning/explorations/indian_removal/removal_timeline.cfm

    Upon their return to Florida, however, most of the chiefs renounced the statement, claiming that they had not signed it, or that they had been forced to sign it, and in any case, that they did not have the power to decide for all the tribes and bands that resided on the reservation. Even some U.S. Army officers observed that the chiefs “had been wheedled and bullied into signing.” Furthermore, “there is evidence of trickery by the whites in the way the treaty is phrased.”

    References:

    Missall, John and Mary Lou Missal. 2004. Seminole Wars: America’s Longest Indian Conflict. Gainesville, Florida: University Press of Florida.

    Treaty With The Seminole, May 9, 1832. | 7 Stat., 368. | Proclamation, April 12, 1834.Indian Affairs: Laws And Treaties Vol. II, Treaties, compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler. Washington : Government Printing Office, 1904.

    Per the treaty with the Seminoles in 1866: http://digital.library.okstate.edu/kappler/vol2/treaties/sem0910.htm

    Per the southern plains aboriginals: A separate treaty version for the Northern Cheyenne was created in 1865, but they did not sign, as they were allied with Red Cloud and the Oglala Lakota in hostilities against the US.

    Per the Medicine Lodge Treaty, The Treaty was immediately controversial and contested by both the members and other leaders of most of the involved tribal bands. Because most of the tribes were decentralized, acceptance of the treaty was contingent upon ratification by 3/4 of the adult males of each of the tribes. This condition was part of the treaty. The US never obtained sufficient votes for such ratification, and thus the treaty was never made valid or legal. Conflict over treaty terms continued for years.

    The first treaty was signed October 21, 1867, with the Kiowa and Comanche tribes. The second, with the Kiowa-Apache, was signed the same day. The third treaty was signed with the Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho on October 28.

    The treaty tribes never ratified the treaty by vote of adult males, as it required. In addition, by changing allotment policy under the Dawes Act and authorizing sales under the Agreement with the Cheyenne and Arapaho (1890) and the Agreement with the Comanche, Kiowa and Apache (1892) signed with the Cherokee Commission , the Congress effectively further reduced their reservation territory.

    References:

    “Treaty with the Kiowa and Comanche, 1867” (Medicine Lodge Treaty). 15 Stats. 581, Oct. 21, 1867. Ratified July 25, 1868; proclaimed Aug. 25, 1868. In Charles J. Kappler, compiler and editor,Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties — Vol. II: Treaties, pp. 977–982. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1904. Through Oklahoma State University Library, Electronic Publishing Center.

    “Treaty with the Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache, 1867” (Medicine Lodge Treaty). 15 Stats. 589, Oct. 21, 1867. Ratified July 25, 1868; proclaimed Aug. 25, 1868. In Charles J. Kappler, compiler and editor, Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties — Vol. II: Treaties, pp. 982–984. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1904. Through Oklahoma State University Library, Electronic Publishing Center.

    “Treaty with the Cheyenne and Arapaho, 1867” (Medicine Lodge Treaty). 15 Stats. 593, Oct. 28, 1867. Ratified July 25, 1868; proclaimed Aug. 19, 1868. In Charles J. Kappler, compiler and editor, Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties — Vol. II: Treaties, pp. 984–989. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1904. Through Oklahoma State University Library, Electronic Publishing Center.

    Bill Buppert

  5. Matthew 24:16

  6. “Our Southern Highlanders” available free here:
    http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/31709?msg=welcome_stranger
    1913 printing. If the link doesn’t work do a search.
    First time I heard “back of beyond” was in that book.

  7. This was a really fun and well written article. Thanks to both you and Bill Buppert for publishing it.

  8. Alfred E. Neuman

    Reblogged this on The Lynler Report.

  9. Neros Lyre

    I hate the snow,its white and on my land.

  10. how did they get my picture?ive had half the family in here laffin at me! I live above the wide spot in the road kown as Redmond nc.when it got hot down in sc lewis would come up here.madison county is known in the state as bloody Madison a revenue man was once tarred and feathered tied to a log and lauched down the mighty French broad river tha tva in the 30s wanted to put a dam in and destroy whole towns and farms but armed restence stopped all that come visit but be nice. when billy the kid was doing his stuff he was on page 8 of harpers weekly lewis Redmond was on the front page.your friend truckwilkins