Must-Read: “Memories Of Poland – Lessons From Growing Up Under Communism” by Paylie Roberts

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Amazon link

Amazon blurb:

Paylie Roberts spent the first eight years of her life living under communist rule in Poland. From age eight on she grew up in the US and became so Americanized that she refused to acknowledge her native Polish heritage, including her birth name. Only after researching the history of why her family was exiled from Poland by the communist government did she realize the tremendously important and unique lessons that the Polish Solidarity movement offers about overcoming tyranny, oppression, and corruption, and how these lessons are imminently relevant and applicable to America today. Paylie combines her personal story with historical facts and sheds light on the many unnerving similarities between growing up in communist Poland in the early 1980s and life in the US now, in a way that is engaging, insightful and inspiring. She recounts her memories of living under the Soviet Union’s rule over Poland, as her family struggled along with most other Poles just to survive. This book also includes memories that are only told by Poles as they were never recorded in “official” history due to media censorship during those years. Paylie wrote this book not only to honor the brave Polish people (including her parents) for defeating tyranny using largely non-violent means, but also with the hope of spreading knowledge that could help prevent her worst fears from manifesting regarding what the future in “free” America may hold.

My two cents:

Essential in understanding the former United States of America both today and tomorrow, “Memories of Poland” is well-written, heavily footnoted, and tragically persuasive. In capturing what life was like behind the Iron Curtain, the author shows us what life will be like here as socialist tyranny progresses. Even more importantly, she explains how the captive Polish people were able to defy their rulers and create a new future for their country.

Buy two copies: one for you, and one to be shared by the young people in your life.

Highly recommended.

4 responses to “Must-Read: “Memories Of Poland – Lessons From Growing Up Under Communism” by Paylie Roberts

  1. Two relevant points:
    (1) During the short period of open access to the archives of the “fallen” USSR, researchers discovered that Solidarity was controlled opposition—from start to finish a Soviet-run operation. Of course, as today in the FUSA, there were plenty of useful idiots to help.
    (2) Wojtyla the Worst…. er… well… Second Worst since Bergoglio… supposedly made his bones in Solidarity. Who is surprised then that Wojtyla, allegedly a crypto-Jew, was one of the very few Polish prelates to survive the Judeo-Communist occupation of Poland, only to inflict his neo-Judaizing on the universal Catholic Church. More on the roots of Judeo-Communism here: http://judaism.is/perpetrators.html

    Who else remembers John Paul “the Great’s” suppression of the fact-filled investigation of the collaboration of Archbishop Stefan Wyszyński? —like Wojtyla another survivor who could not withstand real investigation?

  2. Yeap… and “borrowing ideals” from bullshitvist indoctri-nation,
    they set up “comittes” in each block to snitch on “neighbors” from
    feeding their families and friends, usually when the black market
    suddenly pops up all of a sudden – Free Enterprice. I remember!

    The vultures are here to roost! Been here for a long time!
    Hopefully, the many which made their way here from that
    type of world (from of government), and their offspring, will remember
    that this bastion is probably the last to make a final and decisive stand.
    Let us pray (apply). Repent – Turn around – Go the other Way.

    “Every man to his family and his belongings”

  3. Alfred E. Neuman

    Reblogged this on ETC., ETC., & ETC. and commented:
    Essential in understanding the former United States of America both today and tomorrow, “Memories of Poland” is well-written, heavily footnoted, and tragically persuasive. In capturing what life was like behind the Iron Curtain, the author shows us what life will be like here as socialist tyranny progresses. Even more importantly, she explains how the captive Polish people were able to defy their rulers and create a new future for their country.

  4. Paylie Roberts

    I must partially disagree with Mr. Al Liguori. While certain individuals or cells of Solidarity were factually known to have been controlled opposition (agents provocateur, disinformation plants, or infiltrated moles), I would vehemently argue that Solidarity as a whole was most certainly NOT controlled opposition. I have researched the history of Solidarity **extensively** – both academically through many books and records (public and private), and also through discussions and interviews with individuals who had *first hand involvement* in Solidarity. And I can say with certainty that the majority of Solidarity was absolutely a legitimate resistance movement against communist occupation. To argue that Solidarity was completely controlled opposition is absurd – tantamount to saying that the entire US civil rights movement was completely controlled opposition. Similarly, there may have been controlled opposition individuals or cells that had infiltrated the civil rights movement, but as a whole it was legit – and effective. Watching out for infiltrators, disinformationists and moles is certainly something that today’s Liberty Movement ought to be mindful of. Clearly Mr. Al Liguori has not read my book. For those interested I would recommend doing more homework on the subject before accepting the uninformed or misinformed idea that Solidarity was purely controlled opposition.